Existing Socal Aircraft noise impacts

By request I created this map of existing (pre-NextGen) noise impacts from aircraft in the SoCal study area. Uses are to compare what you’re hearing against the FAA’s modeled baseline. For noise impacts due to proposed SoCal NextGen refer to : Total noise impacts Change in noise impacts Disclaimer: This map only contains those flight …

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Change in Noise over Residences-map

Following is the second part of the proposed changes noise mapping- How noise will change in each census block in the SoCal Metroplex. I’ve already mapped the total aircraft noise map here. Firstly, the FAA did provide this disclaimer about the use of this data: “This information is provided for informational proposes only and is not intended for …

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Total Aircraft noise over Population map

I’m still wading through the data the FAA team has given us. Some of my initial comments to the EA team were that we needed the noise data, waypoint coordinates and.. that it’d be nice to have the Google Earth flight track data. The feedback I got back then was that was asking too much. …

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Specific feedback on Aircraft Activity Assumptions

Below are some comments and specific feedback on the assumptions about the mix of airplanes used in modeling the noise data. Comments are specific to LAX aircraft aggregation and is also intended to be applicable as a general comment to other airports. Segmentation of Night time operations are not represented 1.) During daytime the LAX airport operates in …

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Meteorological effects change sound propagation.

Local and Seasonal Meteorological differences change sound propagation. Sound propagation is affected by atmospheric conditions. The FAA’s Environmental Assessment(EA) assumes a homogeneous atmosphere with a single temperature, humidity level and pressure. This doesn’t correlate with real-world conditions. Southern California is subject to persistent meteorological effects, such as inversion layers and prevailing winds. Temperature and humidity are …

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