Aircraft Noise mapping from Cultural data

The FAA has released a portion of the noise impact results used in the Environmental Assessment. The data is on cultural resources identified by the Department of Transportation as potentially having noise sensitivity. It’s mostly parks, wildlife refuges, open spaces and historic sites – it’s called 4(f) data. The FAA also used modeled census block …

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CNEL should be used instead of DNL in CA

CNEL is the California metric used to measure noise annoyances. The FAA is using the wrong noise metric to describe aircraft noise in the Draft Environmental Assessment (EA). California’s differing cultural and environmental noise threshold expectations are reflected in the State’s mandate to use the Community Noise Equivalent Level (CNEL) metric for assessing airport noise …

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EA fails on Federally identified Noise Sensitive areas

The EA’s Noise Criteria fails when considering Section 4(f) properties and resources. Special consideration, such as cumulative impacts, needs to be given to noise changes in sensitive areas. An Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) may be warranted to discuss noise impacts on sensitive sites. The EA’s Noise Criteria doesn’t apply to Sensitive Areas. FAA Order 1050.1E …

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Ambient Noise Levels should be considered in Noise Criteria

The Noise Criteria Threshold is too high above ambient Noise Levels. The threshold needs to factor in aircraft’s noise contribution to ambient noise levels. The EA presents aircraft noise and only considers noises above DNL 45 dB as relevant to the Noise Criteria. The Noise Criteria should include existing neighborhood ambient noise levels as a baseline to compare …

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The Culver City Flight Paths

Two major aircraft arrival flight paths to LAX fly over Culver City and the FAA proposes changing their heights and positions. The FAA redesign of Southern California airspace is to take advantage of NextGen satellite navigation. Over 109 new satellite procedures propose to increase airspace efficiency and reduce complexity to flights arriving and departing at 16 …

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